Tag Archives: photography

Installation Inspiration

23 Mar

everson

Photo collage by Rachel Turner based on the art of Vanessa German.  Link to Rachel Turner’s Flickr here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/94351890@N03/

 

A recent visit to Everson Museum of Art was full of inspiration for my daughter and I.  Vanessa German had an installation titled “de.structive dis.tillation” that had many interesting sculptures, photos and even small paintings.  My daughter used some of her photographs from our visit to produce the photo collage above.  Another blogger wrote about Vanessa German which you can read here: via be the rage and be the light — Monica Aissa Martinez  If you get a chance to visit the Everson Museum in Syracuse, New York, the exhibit will be up until May 7th.  The link for Everson is here  https://www.everson.org/explore/current-exhibitions.

 

Photography Gives Direction to Painting

12 Jan
daguerreotype

Sample of an early daguerreotype.

 

The first daguerreotype appeared in 1839 and ostensibly people thought the introduction of the camera would be the end of painting.  Remarkably, over 170 years later we can see painting is alive and well.  We find events like paint and sip parties are extremely popular.

Photography has influenced painting in many ways.  Is it possible that photography has pushed painting towards abstraction?

Photography has steadily stood as an authority in representation and has increased the need for articulation of the importance of painting.  So, the question of which medium produces the greatest representational work has been settled.  Now the goal in painting can focus on how to go beyond representation rather than to supplant photography.

The rejection of conventional technique is one of the ways painters avoid this camera-competition.

I’ve been reading about Fairfield Porter (a painter from 1960s) and how his paintings are an unfinished style of representationalism.  Many of the contemporary paintings today are similar in that they are both straight forward and almost unfinished, the color moves in and out of naturalism and the compositions are usually casual.

You can read more about Porter’s work here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairfield_Porter  and http://www.theartstory.org/artist-porter-fairfield.htm

Painting on the Edge

29 Dec

836px-three_dancers_in_yellow_skirts_edgar_degas

“Three Dancers in Yellow Skirts” by Edgar Degas c. 1891

Degas is one artist that is widely recognized to be among the first to break from traditional composition with his arbitrary edges.  Similar to how a photograph has edges which cut the broader landscape, Degas makes a sharp cut in his painting, “Three Dancers in Yellow Skirts” above.  Of course edges in a painting are far less arbitrary due to control by the painter, but I see this as a fun challenge and a great opportunity for experimentation and creativity.