Archive | January, 2017

Playing for Increased Creativity

27 Jan
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Wild Horses carved stamp by Katie Turner

Over the month of December 2016 I participated in Julie Fei-Fan Balzer’s #CarveDecember challenge.   At first I wasn’t sure I would be able to carve that many stamps because December is incredibly busy for me but I managed to find the time.  The commitment to this Instagram challenge helped me step out of my comfort zone.  It was playtime!

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Carved rubber stamp Chair by Katie Turner

I’ve read that playing with other mediums can do lots to enhance creativity, but how does it work?  Play can feel like permission to make anything – including making a mess.  It’s a way to say “hey, it’s ok to fail”.  It allows the mind to daydream and be frivolous.

Brian Sutton-Smith wrote the book “The Ambiguity of Play” which outlines the importance of play and Stuart Brown wrote “Play: How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul” which outlines detailed studies of people as well.

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Vintage Square carved by Katie Turner

Doing the #CarveDecember challenge was fun and refreshing and gave me new ideas to work on this season.  If you like to challenge yourself and grow creatively, there are many places on the internet to participate.  The www.artistsnetwork.com is only one of them with their Studio Saturday Art Challenges.  You can also find challenges across the various social media – Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook.  Why not try one out this month?

(If you want to follow my posts on Instagram its under katieturnerart)

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Carved Cowboy Hat Rubber Stamp by Katie Turner

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Carved Heart Rubber Stamp by Katie Turner

Photography Gives Direction to Painting

12 Jan
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Sample of an early daguerreotype.

 

The first daguerreotype appeared in 1839 and ostensibly people thought the introduction of the camera would be the end of painting.  Remarkably, over 170 years later we can see painting is alive and well.  We find events like paint and sip parties are extremely popular.

Photography has influenced painting in many ways.  Is it possible that photography has pushed painting towards abstraction?

Photography has steadily stood as an authority in representation and has increased the need for articulation of the importance of painting.  So, the question of which medium produces the greatest representational work has been settled.  Now the goal in painting can focus on how to go beyond representation rather than to supplant photography.

The rejection of conventional technique is one of the ways painters avoid this camera-competition.

I’ve been reading about Fairfield Porter (a painter from 1960s) and how his paintings are an unfinished style of representationalism.  Many of the contemporary paintings today are similar in that they are both straight forward and almost unfinished, the color moves in and out of naturalism and the compositions are usually casual.

You can read more about Porter’s work here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairfield_Porter  and http://www.theartstory.org/artist-porter-fairfield.htm